1. Soldier Responds To Letter From A First Grader
Juice Box, duffelblog.com
Dear Mackenzie, Thanks for your kind words. The support of young Americans like you makes everything we do feel at least marginally worthwhile. But let’s get a few things straight. First of all, I’m not your friend. In fact, I specifically tried t…

Some people just can’t understand satire inside of a satire

    Soldier Responds To Letter From A First Grader
    Juice Box, duffelblog.com

    Dear Mackenzie, Thanks for your kind words. The support of young Americans like you makes everything we do feel at least marginally worthwhile. But let’s get a few things straight. First of all, I’m not your friend. In fact, I specifically tried t…

    Some people just can’t understand satire inside of a satire

  2. Twitter / DanielZiv: Istilah baru di kalangan cemot …twitter.com
Isti­lah baru di kalan­gan cemot geng bal­a­pan gitu… (via @milaleu­tik) pic.twitter.com/lyXBxHJN1r

WTF is this?!?!

    Twitter / DanielZiv: Istilah baru di kalangan cemot …
    twitter.com

    Isti­lah baru di kalan­gan cemot geng bal­a­pan gitu… (via @milaleu­tik) pic.twitter.com/lyXBxHJN1r

    WTF is this?!?!

  3. NORAD Under Fire For Its Famous Santa Tracker
AP/The Huffington Post, huffingtonpost.com
DEN­VER (AP) — The U.S. and Cana­di­an mil­i­tary’s beloved Santa Track­er is fac­ing some­thing new this year — pub­lic crit­i­cism.A chil­dren’s advo­ca­cy group says an ani­mat­ed video on the NORAD Tracks Santa web­site injects mil­i­tarism…

AHAHAHAHAHAHA!

    NORAD Under Fire For Its Famous Santa Tracker
    AP/The Huffington Post, huffingtonpost.com

    DEN­VER (AP) — The U.S. and Cana­di­an mil­i­tary’s beloved Santa Track­er is fac­ing some­thing new this year — pub­lic crit­i­cism.

    A chil­dren’s advo­ca­cy group says an ani­mat­ed video on the NORAD Tracks Santa web­site injects mil­i­tarism…

    AHAHAHAHAHAHA!

  4. menandtheirdogs:

caredog1: Love!

    menandtheirdogs:

    caredog1: Love!

  5. Twitter / Journotopia: Police outside the Met Police …twitter.com
Police out­side the Met Police HQ wait­ing to greet pro­test­ers - with red roses! pic.twitter.com/IiXgZ73tBN

Hot army with flawa’

    Twitter / Journotopia: Police outside the Met Police …
    twitter.com

    Police out­side the Met Police HQ wait­ing to greet pro­test­ers - with red roses! pic.twitter.com/IiXgZ73tBN

    Hot army with flawa’

  6. George Takei Releases Perfume, ‘Eau My’
James Nichols, huffingtonpost.com
"Star Trek" alum and gay icon George Takei real­ly never lets us down — and the name of his new fra­grance cer­tain­ly doesn’t either.Echo­ing his sig­na­ture phrase, Takei has fit­ting­ly (and hilar­i­ous­ly) named his new uni­sex fra­grance…

Ohhh My… LOL

    George Takei Releases Perfume, ‘Eau My’
    James Nichols, huffingtonpost.com

    "Star Trek" alum and gay icon George Takei real­ly never lets us down — and the name of his new fra­grance cer­tain­ly doesn’t either.

    Echo­ing his sig­na­ture phrase, Takei has fit­ting­ly (and hilar­i­ous­ly) named his new uni­sex fra­grance…

    Ohhh My… LOL

  7. andsinceweare:

Me at parties


Gyahahahahah

    andsinceweare:

    Me at parties

    Gyahahahahah

    (Source: peterfromtexas, via shadow-company-1)

  8. Oh my…

    Oh my…

    (Source: marinebuzz)

  9. machodesungao:


http://machodesungao.tumblr.com/

    machodesungao:

    http://machodesungao.tumblr.com/

    (via gajosbons)

  10. 
"A man sat at a metro station in Washington DC and started to play the violin; it was a cold January morning. He played six Bach pieces for about 45 minutes. During that time, since it was rush hour, it was calculated that 1,100 people went through the station, most of them on their way to work.
Three minutes went by, and a middle aged man noticed there was musician playing. He slowed his pace, and stopped for a few seconds, and then hurried up to meet his schedule.
A minute later, the violinist received his first dollar tip: a woman threw the money in the till and without stopping, and continued to walk.
A few minutes later, someone leaned against the wall to listen to him, but the man looked at his watch and started to walk again. Clearly he was late for work.
The one who paid the most attention was a 3 year old boy. His mother tagged him along, hurried, but the kid stopped to look at the violinist. Finally, the mother pushed hard, and the child continued to walk, turning his head all the time. This action was repeated by several other children. All the parents, without exception, forced them to move on.
In the 45 minutes the musician played, only 6 people stopped and stayed for a while. About 20 gave him money, but continued to walk their normal pace. He collected $32. When he finished playing and silence took over, no one noticed it. No one applauded, nor was there any recognition.
No one knew this, but the violinist was Joshua Bell, one of the most talented musicians in the world. He had just played one of the most intricate pieces ever written, on a violin worth $3.5 million dollars.
Two days before his playing in the subway, Joshua Bell sold out at a theater in Boston where the seats averaged $100.
This is a real story. Joshua Bell playing incognito in the metro station was organized by the Washington Post as part of a social experiment about perception, taste, and priorities of people. The outlines were: in a commonplace environment at an inappropriate hour: Do we perceive beauty? Do we stop to appreciate it? Do we recognize the talent in an unexpected context?
One of the possible conclusions from this experience could be:
If we do not have a moment to stop and listen to one of the best musicians in the world playing the best music ever written, how many other things are we missing?”
-Josh Nonnenmoc

    "A man sat at a metro station in Washington DC and started to play the violin; it was a cold January morning. He played six Bach pieces for about 45 minutes. During that time, since it was rush hour, it was calculated that 1,100 people went through the station, most of them on their way to work.

    Three minutes went by, and a middle aged man noticed there was musician playing. He slowed his pace, and stopped for a few seconds, and then hurried up to meet his schedule.

    A minute later, the violinist received his first dollar tip: a woman threw the money in the till and without stopping, and continued to walk.

    A few minutes later, someone leaned against the wall to listen to him, but the man looked at his watch and started to walk again. Clearly he was late for work.

    The one who paid the most attention was a 3 year old boy. His mother tagged him along, hurried, but the kid stopped to look at the violinist. Finally, the mother pushed hard, and the child continued to walk, turning his head all the time. This action was repeated by several other children. All the parents, without exception, forced them to move on.

    In the 45 minutes the musician played, only 6 people stopped and stayed for a while. About 20 gave him money, but continued to walk their normal pace. He collected $32. When he finished playing and silence took over, no one noticed it. No one applauded, nor was there any recognition.

    No one knew this, but the violinist was Joshua Bell, one of the most talented musicians in the world. He had just played one of the most intricate pieces ever written, on a violin worth $3.5 million dollars.

    Two days before his playing in the subway, Joshua Bell sold out at a theater in Boston where the seats averaged $100.

    This is a real story. Joshua Bell playing incognito in the metro station was organized by the Washington Post as part of a social experiment about perception, taste, and priorities of people. The outlines were: in a commonplace environment at an inappropriate hour: Do we perceive beauty? Do we stop to appreciate it? Do we recognize the talent in an unexpected context?

    One of the possible conclusions from this experience could be:

    If we do not have a moment to stop and listen to one of the best musicians in the world playing the best music ever written, how many other things are we missing?”

    -Josh Nonnenmoc

    (Source: jewdaus, via shadow-company-1)

  11. aplethoraofmen:

Sheriff

fuck me sheriff…

    aplethoraofmen:

    Sheriff

    fuck me sheriff…

    (Source: firebootrik)

  12. (Source: dizelash)

Otlet's Shelf theme by Andrew LeClair & Rob Giampietro.